Dr. Abdullah Sherzai

Objective:

With my advanced training in NeuroScience, public health, Management, Conflict resolution, leadership, and research I hope to help humanity overcome suffering.

Experience:

1/2011— Present Loma Linda University

Director of Research Education

Creating a culture of research through education and collaboration.

7/2009—Present Loma Linda University

Director of Research, Neurology Department

Our efforts in Neurology research (Clinical, and Investigator Initiated) has made us the second largest research group in Loma Linda system.

7/2008-Present Loma Linda University

Director of Memory and Aging Center

Create a novel approach to acute and chronic dementing diseases, through a multicultural approach, as well as emphasis on community and preventive measures.

1/2003-12/2005 Deputy Minister of Health Kabul Afghanistan / MiWorld Bank

Deputy Minister of Health

Best management strategy in a post conflict country  (LANCET).

7/2002-12/2002 World Bank

Health consultant for the Afghan Project

Implement World Bank’s PPA health care distribution plan in 10 Afghan provinces, while empowering women to lead the delivery process.

 

Education

1/2010-Present Loma Linda University

Management and Leadership

1/2008-2011 Loma Linda University

Epidemiology of Aging.

7/2006-7/2008 UCSD, Fellow in Dementia/Geriatrics

To learn advanced research techniques for investigating diseases of the elderly and those dealing with dementia in particular.

6/2006-7/2008 UCSD

Masters in Clinical Research (CREST)

7/2000-7/2002 NIH/NINDS

Neurodegenerative diseases/Experimental Therapeutics

7/1999-6/2000 Georgetown University

EMG fellowship

6/1996-5/1999 Georgetown University

Neurology Residency

6/1995-5/1996 Georgetown University

Medicine Residency

5/1992-8/1992 NIH/NINDS

Summer Internship

7/1991-5/1995 Eastern Virginia Medical School

Medical Student

1987-1990 George Mason University

B.S. in Biochemistry and B.S. in Psychology

1986-1987 University of Pittsburgh

B.S. Biochemistry

PUBLICATION:

Published:

A. Sherzai, Steven D Edland, Eliezer Masliah, Lawrence Hansen, Donald P Pizzo, Ayesha Z Sherzai, Jody Corey-Bloom

Alzheimer’s and Dementia-2012-Spongiform change in Lewy body dementia and Alzheimer disease.

Sherzai AZ, Heim L, Boothsby C, A Sherzai

Stroke risk and Nutritional factors

Journal of Nutrition and Geriatrics (to be published in October Edition)

Heim L, Perez L, Sherzai AZ, A Sherzai

Vascular Dementia and Nutrition

Journal of Nutrition and Aging  (to be published in September)

Banta JE, Belk I, Newton K, Sherzai A.

Inpatient charges and mental illness: Findings from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample 1999-2007.

Clinicoecon Outcomes Res. 2010;2:149-58. Epub 2010 Oct 11.

 

Eyler Lisa, Sherzai A, Allison R. Kaup, M.S., Dilip V. Jeste,  M.D.

A Review of Functional Brain Imaging Correlates of Successful Cognitive Aging

Bio. Psychiatry. 2011

Whitehair DC, Sherzai A, Emond J, Raman R, Aisen PS, Petersen RC, Fleisher AS.

Influence of apolipoprotein E varepsilon4 on rates of cognitive and functional decline in mild cognitive impairment.

Alzheimer’s Disease Cooperative Study.

Alzheimers Dement. 2010 Sep;6(5):412-9.

Fleisher AS, Raman R, Siemers ER, Becerra L, Clark CM, Dean RA, Farlow MR, Galvin JE, Peskind ER, Quinn JF, Sherzai A, Sowell BB, Aisen PS, Thal LJ.

Phase 2 safety trial targeting amyloid beta production with a gamma-secretase inhibitor in Alzheimer disease.

Arch Neurol. 2008 Aug;65(8):1031-8.

Bara-Jimenez W, Dimitrova TD, Sherzai A, Aksu M, Chase TN.

Glutamate release inhibition ineffective in levodopa-induced motor complications.

Mov Disord. 2006 Sep;21(9):1380-3.

PMID: 16758479 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

Bara-Jimenez W, Bibbiani F, Morris MJ, Dimitrova T, Sherzai A, Mouradian MM, Chase TN.

Effects of serotonin 5-HT1A agonist in advanced Parkinson’s disease.

Mov Disord. 2005 Aug;20(8):932-6.

PMID: 15791634 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

Bara-Jimenez W, Dimitrova T, Sherzai A, Favit A, Mouradian MM, Chase TN.

Effect of monoamine reuptake inhibitor NS 2330 in advanced Parkinson’s disease.

Mov Disord. 2004 Oct;19(10):1183-6.

PMID: 15390018 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

Bara-Jimenez W, Sherzai A, Dimitrova T, Favit A, Bibbiani F, Gillespie M, Morris MJ, Mouradian MM, Chase TN

Adenosine A(2A) receptor antagonist treatment of Parkinson’s disease.

Neurology. 2003 Aug 12;61(3):293-6.

PMID: 12913186 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

Pending Publication:

2009—Dermatomyositis case study, Vishwa, J Escutin, A Sherzai

2009—Review—Using Health care to empower women in the most recalcitrant of societies– Lavinia Mitroi, Ayesha Z Sherzai, A. Dean Sherzai

Current research:

2012–NIS: Oldest Old/ Dementia comorbidities and outcomes

2012–NIS: Dementia in hospital mortality

2012–Review: Micronutrients and risk of Parkinson’s disease

2010—Experimental nutrition and cell adhesion in stroke

2010— Review: foods affecting cognitive status across diverse populations

2010—Influence of diet and lifestyle on the risk of dementia: AHS

2010— Review: community based screening interventions for mild cognitive impairments

2010— Review on community based exercise models in the elderly

2010— Evaluating patterns of dementia care among elderly patients using national inpatient sample

2010—The ethical issues amongst the elderly with cognitive impairment

2010—Community Based approach to cognitive health management in four diverse communities

2009—Influence of diet and lifestyle as manifested in CVLT scores in a cohort of AHS subjects

2009—Retrospective study on dietary effects on stroke patients in the AHS

2009—Diet (high PUFA and vegetarian diet) and its influence on cognitive decline

2009—Influence of acute treatment of delirium in long term risk for Dementia

2008—Cognitive status in Adventist population (diet stratified)

Other Publications:

2010-Harvard College Global health review—Reflections on Reconstruction of the Afghan Health Care system

2009-Aventist Review—Healhty Aging

2008-Physician –Dementia and Aging

Unpublished work:

2002—Intraparenchymal infusion of Glial cell line derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF)      in the treatment of Progressive Supranuclear Palsy (PSP). (unpublished)

Books and Book Chapters

5- Minute Consult 2012– Transient Global Amnesia

Current Trials

Overseeing more than 16 Clinical trials in Movement disorders, Neuromuscular, MS, ALS, Stroke, and Pain.

PI on Pfizer Bapinuzomab Alzheimer’s trial

Past Clinical Trials

2006-2008—AAB-02 (Passive immunization in Alzheimer’s)

2006-2008–Phase 2 safety trial targeting amyloid beta production with a gamma-secretase inhibitor in Alzheimer disease

2000-2002– PI and Sub I on more than 7 clinical trials at NIH

Talks/ Seminars/ Conferences

Community Talks

1)  Healthy brain aging –Bowmont talk July 2008

2)  Healthy brain aging — LLU east Campus–Thursday March 05, 2009.     10:30- 11:30

3)  Healthy brain aging– Sun lakes– Friday  April 10 2009.    10:00- 11:30

4)  Healthy brain aging– Redlands Senior Center– Thursday May 21, 2009.    10:30- 11:30

5)  Healthy brain aging–Yucaipa Senior Center– Thursday June 11, 2009.    10:30- 11:30

6)  Healthy brain aging– Rancho Cucamonga– Thursday August 20, 2009.   10:30- 11:30

7)  Healthy brain aging- (Community (fait based) approach) — Azure Hill church Saturday 2008

8)  Healthy brain aging– (Community (fait based) approach) — Hill top church Saturday 2008

9)  Healthy brain aging– (Community (fait based) approach) — Spanish church Loma Linda 2009

10)          Healthy brain aging– Tamecula– thursday November 19, 2009.        10:30- 11:30

11)          Healthy brain aging– Chino Senior Center– Tuesday Jan. 19, 2010.        10:00- 11:00

12)         Healthy brain aging– City of Chino Hills– Friday Feb. 05, 2010.      10:30- 11:30

13)         Memory disorders and Healthy brain aging– Yucaipa Senior Center– Friday April 16 2010.      10:30- 11:30

14)          Healthy brain aging– Rancho Cucamonga– Friday, May 14, 2010.       10:30- 11:30

15)          Healthy brain aging- talk to Physicians Arrowhead community –  August 19th.  10:00- 2:00pm

16)          Healthy brain aging– Mary Philips Senior Center– Friday August 27, 2010.     10:30- 11:30

17)          Healthy brain aging– Redlands Jocalyn Senior Center– Friday, Sep. 10, 2010.     11:00- 12:00

18)          Healthy brain aging– City of Chino Hills– Friday, November 05, 2010.     10:30- 11:30

19)          Healthy brain aging- community involvement (10 African American Churches)– Saturday November 06, 2010– 10:00- 1:00pm

20)          Healthy brain aging– Lake Elsinore Senior Center –Friday Nov. 05 2010.    12:15-13:15

21)          Healthy brain aging– Yucaipa Senior Center–Thursday, Jan. 13 2011.    10:30- 11:30

22)          Healthy brain aging– Rancho Cucamonga Senior Center– Tuesday, Feb. 15, 2011.    10:30- 11:30

23)          Healthy brain aging- Redlands Joslyn Senior Center– Thursday, April 21, 2011.    11:00- 12:00

24)          Healthy brain aging– Mary Phillips Senior Center Temecula– Wednesday, Sep. 14 2011.   10:30- 11:30

25)          Healthy brain aging- Lake Elsinore Senior Center– Wednesday, Sep. 14 2011.  12:30- 13:30

 

26)          2010 APC On Dementia and Aging for LLU Alumni

27)          Healthy Aging talk with Ayesha– Rancho Cucamonga Mosque– Nov. 13 2010.

28)          Lecture on Healthy brain Aging for Dental alumni association — Loma Linda Centennial hall – February 2011

29)         3-4-11-APC talk on Dementia and Aging for the Loma Linda Alumni

30)         3-6-11-Healthy Cognitive Aging — Afghan Women’s Association community health – presented to national television

31)          Healthy Aging with Ayesha – Afghan TV —

32)          Healthy aging — Loma Linda Senior Center — April 21- 2011

33)          Healthy aging — Chino Senior Center — April 22- 2011  27th Annual IACC Spring Conference. The Aging of the Inland Empire:  A Collaborative in Putting the Pieces Together 8:30am – 4:30pm

34) International access TV — Healthy aging (community based)– May 9th 2011

35) Healthy brain aging– (Community (fait based) approach) May 20 – Mosque- San gabriel

36) June 2nd healthy Chino Tuesday, June 21, 2011       Topic  Healthy Aging

11:00 – 12:30       Redlands Joslyn Senior Center

37) Oct.17 Palm Spring Senior center — Healthy Brain Aging

38) Oct.17 Healthy Brain Aging — Palm Spring Hyatt– Physician continued education

39) Oct-29-2011 Chino Alzheimer’s Association Walk

40) Nov- 10- 2011  AARP Riverside county conference on Aging

41) 12-05-2011  American Health Care Congress– Challenges for health care in a rapidly aging society

42) Healthy Aging Conference: March 6th-7th 2012

Awards

NIH/ DUKE UNIVERSITY Masters in clinical research; Full Scholarship  2002

NIA/NIH SUMMER INTERNSHIP AWARD 2009

NINDS/NIH STUDENT INTERNSHIP AWARD 2002

Resident Appreciation Award, Neurology Department, 2010

Resident Appreciation Award, Neurology Department 2011

Best Researcher Award, Neurology 2010

Best Researcher Award, Neurology 2011

National Coalition Building Awards, Afghan government 2003

Additional Professional Experience

Member of Internal medicine research committee 2011

Board Member of Institute of Community Development 2011

Member of Board of DOA Orphanage Philippines 2011

A.A.E.C (Afghan American Electoral Council) – elected from amongst 250,000 Afghan Americans as one of 10 representatives who where to raise community concerns to the U.S. government and advocate for those who needed the greatest help.

A.C.C. (Asia Consulting Corporation) Founder and CEO – established to facilitate the implementation of projects in post conflict countries.

Health4Family.com  LLC. Founder and CEO –Established to provide for the health care needs of the family.

US-ARC (U.S. Afghanistan Reconstruction Council) founder and CEO- The largest Afghan American NGOs establish post 9/11 created for the purpose of facilitating reconstruction in Afghanistan.

A.S.A. (Afghan Student Association) Founder and President – was established to provide aid for the beleaguered people of Afghanistan using the student resources in the United States.

Public Health:

2003-Human Resource Policy of the Ministry Health of Afghanistan

2003-Construction Policy for the Ministry of Health of Afghanistan

2003-Basic Package of Health Services for Health Ministry of Afghanistan

Professional Memberships

American Association of Neurology

American Medical Association

Languages

English, Dari

Accreditations

Medical Doctor, Neurologist, Clinical Research

 

Service experience

Member of Operation Smile team in China, participated in a humanitarian mission that was able to operate on over 180 children suffering from burns and congenital deformities such as cleft lip and palate.

Helped raise funds and establish more than five orphanages in Afghanistan

References

Dr. David Penner—Chair Dept. of Management and Leadership

Dr. Synnove Knutsen—Chair Dept. Epidemiology Loma Linda University

Dr. Gary Fraser—Primary investigator Adventist Health Study

Dr. Bryan Tsao—Director of Loma Linda Neurology Department

Dr. Dilip Jeste—Director Stein Aging Institute

Dr. Thomas Chase Director of Experimental Therapeutics Branch of NINDS/ NIH

Dr. Jonathan Pincus—Director Neurology Georgetown University.

 

Public health references:

 

Dr. Richard H. Hart— President Loma Linda University

Dr. Tricia Penniecook–Dean of School of Public Health

Dr. Jackson –Dean of school of Allied Health

Julie Louise Gerberding—former director of U.S. Centers for Disease

Five Week Trip to Afghanistan Spring 2005

NAFISA ABDULLAH, M.D

SUMMERY : FIVE WEEKS TRIP IN AFGHANISTAN, SPRING
2005.

KABUL –MEDICAL SCHOOL:

CHERAGH. IN THE MEDICAL SCHOOL,

OBSERVATION OF VARIOUS LABS, TO BE EVALUATED FOR FURTHER
AIDS. NOTICING SOME EQUIPMENTS, NO MATERIAL AVAILABLE FOR
LABS AND DID NOT SEE ANY PRACTICAL WORK IN THE LABS BY
STUDENTS

ATTENDING TO SOME OF THE CLASSES AND LECTURE HALLS TO
OBSERVE THE STANDARD OF TEACHING

MANY INTERVIEWS WITH MALE AND FEMALE STUDENTS AND
LISTENING TO THEIR CONCERNS.

MEETINGS WITH ATTENDING PHYSICIANS AND LISTENING TO THEIR
CONCERNS AND PROBLEMS

ATTENDING AS GUST OF MEDICAL SCHOOL AND MEMBER OF
EXECUTIVE OF AMAA. FOR FOUR DAYS NATIONAL WORKSHOP ON
PRINCIPAL OF CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT. WHICH WAS
ORGANIZED BY KABUL MEDICAL INSTITUTE AND SUPPORTED BY
THE WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION. DURING THIS MEETING
BROUGHT UP THE CONCERNS OF STUDENTS AND TEACHING STAFF
TO THE ATTENTION

EVALUATION OF PRINTING DEPARTMENT OF THE MEDICAL SCHOOL.
SPENDING GOOD AMOUNT OF TIME IN VARIOUS SHOPS IN KABUL
PURCHASING PRINTING EQUIPMENT ( TWO LARGE PRINTING
GUSTNER ONE GESTO FAX TWO TYPE WRITER ONE IN ENGLISH IAND
ONE IN FARSI ONE LARGE STAPLER AND ONE LARGE PAPER
CUTTER). )THEN FORMALLY AND OFFICIALLY PRESENTED TO THE
DEAN OF THE MEDICAL SCHOOL AND THE HEAD OF THE PRINTING
DEPARTMENT AND THEIR STAFF AS DONATION FROM AMAA TO HELP
THE STUDENTS AND TEACHERS. THEY WERE GRATEFUL AND
THANKFUL TO AMAA AND RECEIVED A FORMAL THANK YOU LETTER
FROM THE DEAN OF THE MEDICAL SCHOOL

SEVERAL MEETINGS WITH DR

NAFISA ABDULLAH, M.D

MALALI MATERNITY HOSPITAL.

MORNING ROUNDS AND CASE PRESENTATION OF OBSTETRICS &
GYNECOLOGICAL PROBLEMS BY PATIENTS BED SIDE. SEVERAL
LECTURES IN THE LECTURE HALL OF THE HOSPITAL FOR
OBSTETRICIAN AND GYNECOLOGIST. FETAL DOPPLER AS A
PERSONAL GIFT AND ALSO TWENTY FIVE SET OF STETHOSCOPE
WHICH WAS DONATED BY DR NOOR ZIA TAJYAR WAS GIVEN TO THE
DEPARTMENT OF OB-GYN,
ALSO THREE AMERICAN NURSE MID WIVES WITH THE SUPPORT
OF ARO ( AFGHAN RELIEF ORGANIZATION) WAS INTRODUCED TO
THE DEPARTMENT OF OB GYN).

RABIA BALKHI MATERNITY HOSPITAL.

VISIT WITH THE DIRECTOR OF THE HOSPITAL AND VISIT WITH AMERICAN
ADMINISTRATOR OF THE MATERNITY SECTION. TEN THOUSAND SUTURES
WHICH WAS COLLECTED PERSONALLY AND WAS DONATED BY KAISER
PERMANENTE OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA ,WEST LOS ANGELES GIVEN TO
THE HOSPITAL AND I RECEIVED A FORMAL THANK YOU NOTE FROM THE
DIRECTOR OF THE HOSPITALS. SOME MEDICATION WAS DONATED BY DR
BIR AND DR SADDIQ WAS GIVEN TO THE HOSPITAL.

MEETING WITH MR. KHALIALZAD , THE AMERICAN
AMBASSADOR TO AFGHANISTAN. AND DR PETER
SALIH.IN THIS MEETING THE CONDITION OF RABIA BALKHI

HOSPITAL ,WHICH WAS IN TERRIBLE CONDITION AFTER SPENDING FIVE
MILLION DOLLARS ,WAS BROUGHT UP IN THIER ATTENTION AND ADVISED
TO TAKE THE MATTER SERIOUS.

MEETINGS WITH EMERGENCY ITALIAN IN KABUL&
PANG SHEER.

WORK IN DEPARTMENT OF (OB&GYN) THIRTY BED OB GYN , BY

EMERGENCY ITALIAN. AN ORGANIZATION FOR (Life Support for

Civilian Victims of War and Poverty)

BAMYAN. VISITED

BAMYAN HOSPITAL SUPPORT BY AGHA KHAN
HUMANITARIAN FOUND.

CONCLUSION AND SUGGESTION PRESENTED TO AFGHAN

MEDICAL ASSOCIATION OF AMERCA. EXECUTIVE AND BOARD

NAFISA ABDULLAH, M.D

Emergency in Afghanistan: Beyond an Ordinary Hospital

Emergency in Afghanistan: Beyond an Ordinary Hospital

THE EXPERIENCE was indeed a rewarding one. I have just returned from
Afghanistan where I was visiting Emergency hospitals in Panjsheer and Kabul.
The Emergency hospital in Panjsheer was built in one of Afghanistan s mountainous
territories in the village of Anaba: a remote and impoverished area. Emergency
maintains the only hospital in the area and provides excellent medical care while
respecting the dignity of patients and the culture of the region. Panjsheer, due to its
vicinity to Kabul and its strategic value, was plagued by war during the past twenty-five
years. It is located northeast of Kabul. The people of the area̶mainly civilians̶have
suffered tremendously. In spite of the painful history of this region, when I arrived I was
greeted at Lion Gate, the entrance to the valley, by old and young faces, warm faces of
children, some tired, some scared, but each person ever inspired and hospitable. At the
Emergency Panjsheer hospital, I noticed first the sign NO WEAPONS painted in red
letters on a white board and a little further on, I found the sign WE TAKE CARE OF
PATIENTS FREE OF CHARGE.

As a physician I specialize in Obstetrics and Gynecology. I spent the majority of my
visit in that department where I had the pleasure of meeting an international group of
professionals, skilled and caring physicians, midwives, and nurses. The hospital has a
first-class operating room, an immaculately clean delivery room, a welcoming and
comfortable postpartum ward for new mothers, and a well-equipped nursery for
newborns. I was particularly amazed to see the degree of careful attention to detail in
this hospital since it is located in a remote and impoverished part of the country. In
contrast, during my time in Kabul I visited some non-Emergency maternity hospitals that
were reportedly funded by millions of dollars.

With frustration I observed that the hospitals were badly managed, and sadly in shambles. During my recent trip, as well as on a previous trip, I discussed this with authorities in Afghanistan and colleagues in
the USA, informing them that the Emergency hospitals provide ideal models of how to
build and run a hospital and how to provide quality care to patients who need it.
As I spent time in the Obstetrics and Gynecology wards of the Emergency hospitals,
it gave me great joy to speak with women who had received prenatal care from the
eighth or ninth week of pregnancy to the baby s birth. They had enjoyed access to
prenatal follow-ups, ultrasounds, nutrition consultations and were given advice about
caring for a newborn. In this country 90 percent of pregnant women lack prenatal care
partly due to culture but mainly due to decades of war resulting in the absence of
hospitals and clinics. The women I met at the Emergency hospitals celebrated every
aspect of their care and kept each appointment until delivery. As a result, they had a
healthy pregnancy, and a healthy baby. In addition, I was encouraged to see ongoing
training of national staff and midwives at the Emergency hospitals.

The valuable professional skills gained by the national staff will contribute to the growth of a
healthcare system in Afghanistan’s future.
Emergency serves several other villages in the area of Anaba with first aid and
primary health centers where no other medical facilities exist. Emergency provides
medical care to the nomadic Kuchi people who migrate through the Panjsheer valleys
as they move to the high country for the summer, in my conversations with some of
them I learned that they stay longer in the area in order to have prenatal care and have
a delivery in the hospital. This is particularly unusual for Kuchies, since they have never
had access to medical or prenatal care.

Every single pregnancy and birth is different. As an -experienced physician
practicing in the United States, in a state-of-the-art hospital, I have faced catastrophic
obstetrical cases and have seen limits of our modern medical abilities tested by
complex emergency cases. I also witnessed such cases in the Emergency hospital in
Panjsheer and saw that they were taken care of effectively and efficiently. Unexpected
cases arrive every day and night in the obstetrics floor . One case was that of a young
woman who was brought to the hospital one night during the eighth month of her first
pregnancy. she had been carrying bread from a bakery to her house through an area
that had been inspected and declared free of mines. However, a mine had evaded
detection by inspectors and as she stepped, she triggered an explosion and was
severely injured. Her case demonstrates that even today roads remain littered with
badly rusting tanks, obstacles, weapons and mines.

When she arrived at the Emergency hospital, she was taken immediately to surgery where the findings were
grim: her uterus was perforated, her unborn baby did not survive, and her right leg had
to be amputated below the knee. After her surgery as I sat near her bed, I could not
then, and today still am not able to find an adequate word of comfort to offer her. A
senseless landmine explosion had taken her leg and her baby. I am still haunted as I
remember the pain she experienced in her loss while her mother sat nearby,
speechless, pale and frozen. By saving her from certain death, the surgery provided by
the Emergency hospital communicated to her a message more powerful and hopeful
than any of my words ever could in the face of such loss.

Emergency in Kabul has a tremendous number of trauma cases that arise from a
variety of causes. It is located in a busy section of the city. The hospital is again
meticulously clean, with dedicated and skilled international staff. This is the only
hospital in the country with six beds in a first-class intensive care unit, and the only CT
SCAN in the country. I happened to meet a family that brought a relative to the hospital
with a life threatening gunshot wound to the head. Their injured family member
underwent a 12-hour operation by a neurosurgeon, and survived.
The life-supporting medical care doesn t stop after the patient leaves the operating
room table. At Emergency, care is continued with excellent postoperative treatments.
Sometimes children have to stay in the hospital for several months.

Emergency provides physical therapy, a rehabilitation program, a playroom for children, and even a
classroom with books in the native language. Teachers read and write with patients as
they recover. For some amputees after recovery, Emergency even provides social
services and opportunities for employment.

Among many wonderful and memorable experiences I had during my trip was an
afternoon spent with a group of women ages seventeen to sixty as they wove carpets
as part of social program of Emergency s hospital in Anaba, Panjsheer valley. In the
room where the women worked, the essential elements of calm and safety that these
women experienced were a beautiful contrast to the violence and struggle that they had
each experienced. We talked for a good many hours, and slowly and tentatively they
opened up to me in their own way. They talked to each other and to me bravely of their
grief, pain, the war and the hurt. Their voices were resonant and comforting to each
others, and in the midst of it all, they laughed and they told their happy stories too. We
all laughed together at times, just like all happy people in the world laugh. The
redemptive power of that laughter spoke for itself while their artistic expression as they
wove those beautiful carpets was made precious by the touch of their care-worn hands.
Some of them were just learning this skill, showing creative drive and human dignity
preserved. That was a lesson to me: no matter what circumstances they had gone
through, they were discovering hope there, and it was palpable. We lifted each other s
spirits with hugs and kisses and a shared human experience, and that is how I lift this
human village. No matter how much I write I will still feel inadequate to complete this
message. There are so many stories, some painful some delightful.

I’m thankful to those who help me to be a small part of this grand organization
Emergency that gives high quality medical care to patients in the most difficult situations
and consistently recognizes the dignity, life and humanity of each individual. You would
do no less, if you saw what I saw. Please help; keep safe these gnarled and nimble
hands that weave the many-colored tapestries. Regarding support of this organization,
my message is simply Do it and the time is now.
Sincerely
Nafisa Abdullah , MD
July 2006

This article was originally published at: http://www.emergencyusa.org/

EMERGENCY USA supports construction and management of international projects for medical care:

• Hospitals specifically dedicated to war victims, providing skilled surgical intervention in emergencies

• Physical and social rehabilitation centers for victims of anti-personnel mines and other war injuries

• First aid posts for emergency treatment and healthcare centers for primary care

• Hospitals offering specialized therapy in places where unmet needs are demonstrated

By building high quality, sustainable regional medical centers (rather than temporary, or minimal-care facilities) EMERGENCY partners with the local population in war torn communities to provide health care services that reach beyond walls to heal communities.

Since 1994 EMERGENCY teams have provided assistance to over 4,668,900 people.

Donations to the Nangarhar Public Health Hospital

On February 11, 2012, a group of college students involved with the United Afghan Club (UAC) at UCLA successfully raised $29,000 in their annual charity fundraiser. The student-led event focused to increase awareness of Afghanistan’s dire infant mortality rate, and help curtail the problem by donating funds to supply the Emergency Obstetric ward at the Nangarhar Public Health Hospital, one of the busiest medical centers in eastern Afghanistan. This venture was made successful by more than 500 attendees from the Southern California Afghan Community.

The Obstetric Center was chosen from among many other charity projects for this year’s fundraiser by the students. The UAC donated the money to the Afghan Medical Association of America (AMAA), a co-sponsor of the event, to disburse and distribute to the Nangarhar Hospital through their extensive experience of being involved with Afghan charities for the past two decades.

In addition to this, the AMAA has contributed $2000 to aid in their efforts. Our President Dr.Yousuf Sadiq has also contributed $1500 personally to the aid efforts led by the UAC. Furthermore we would like to extend our gratitude to the UAC which is showing that the emerging generation of Afghan’s in America have not forgotten about their roots.